Topic: survey methodology


Launching New Products the New Balance Way

For most of history, shoes were made to protect people’s feet from the outside elements. Today, they have evolved from something to keep your feet warm, to status symbols where design is just as important (if not more) as functionality. The sneaker world is booming from millennial demand and professional athletes launching their own brands […]

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9 Survey Mistakes That I’ve Made Throughout My Career

All market researchers have made mistakes, and in this next Qualtrics Master Session, we’ve brought in Michael Murakami Ph.D., part of Airbnb’s team of 60 experience management researchers. Airbnb has 4 million homes listed on its site in more than 191 countries. Needless to say, they run a lot of surveys. Murakami shares his top […]

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6 Ways to Pretest Your Survey Before You Send It

Running your survey through a series of tests to check for potential problems can save you a lot of headaches down the road and ensure that you get the data that you want. In this post we discuss six different strategies for testing surveys before starting your data collection.

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Using Attention Checks in Your Surveys May Harm Data Quality

Thinking of checking up on respondent attention mid-survey to make sure that you’re getting good data? Think again. In this article, we highlight how new findings from our Qualtrics Methodology Lab are helping us to revisit and refine advice that is commonly given to survey researchers, namely the use of attention check questions to ensure […]

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Survey Speeding, Part 2: Designing Surveys to Avoid Harm

Previously we highlighted some of the concerns surrounding people that appear to respond very quickly to surveys. While concerns about survey speeding are valid, there are indications that the solution is not to simply throw out these respondents from your dataset.   Despite the evidence that speeders don’t really appear to be doing that much […]

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Survey Speeding, Part 1: Is It Harmful or Harmless?

If you’ve ever looked at completion times for individual questions or an entire questionnaire, you’ve probably noticed that there can be a lot of variation. Some respondents are slower than you expect, some are in your expected range, and some are faster than you expect. If the fast completion times trouble you in particular, you’re […]

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