Fake Chatbot Inquiry

AshleyLeeAshleyLee New YorkCommunity Member Qubie ✭

Fake Chatbot Inquiry

Hello,

I am interested in using Chatplat for my study and I wonder if I can design a fake chatting room on Qualtrics by using a chatbot (not human confederate) to send pre-designed messages to participants.

Specifically, I would like to make my participants believe that another participant is conducting the same study simultaneously; participants will believe that they just join in the chat room, and will wait for their partner to join in the room for a short time.

After 10 seconds, a fake participant will send brief pre-designed messages (e.g., "Hello! I am XX. I am from XX"); Here, the fake participant should be a computer (I.e., chatbot), not actual human confederate. Participants will also send short greeting messages to the fake partner and once they exchange messages, they will do a series of tasks together that are embedded on Qualtrics.

Do you know any function that I can design this situation? I have Chatplat.com account, but it seems human being should moderate the chat, not a fake bot.

If my question is unclear to you, please let me know. Looking forward to receiving your response. Thank you!

Best,
Ashley

Best Answer

  • KendraRKendraR Provo, UT Moderator
    edited April 19 Accepted Answer

    Hey, @AshleyLee! You might want to look into using Branch Logic and Skip Logic to build this out, as these will allow you to display content based on certain conditions. Creating a delay may require some custom code, so you may want to check out our Developer Corner for help with that. Feel free to reach out to our Support Team with any questions on how to best set this up! :smile:

Answers

  • AshleyLeeAshleyLee New YorkCommunity Member Qubie ✭

    Hi,

    I am now sure how "Branch Logic" and "Skip Logic" can help to build the "fake chatting room". I Below is a detailed description of my proposed study. You can read from the second paragraph starting with "Then":

    The study will be described as examining how people with different personalities form impressions of and interact with others on social media. Once participants read and sign the informed consent form, they will be told that they will interact remotely with another student and will conduct a series of tasks with that student. In fact, there will be no other student and all participants will work individually. Next, participants will be asked basic demographic questions (e.g., gender, major) before they meet another participant (i.e., partner). A few seconds later, they will be told that they are paired up with a partner. Because envy is more likely to occur when compared with a similar other (Smith & Kim, 2007), the partner will be described as a Baruch student of the same gender, academic major, and year in school, as the participants. Also, the name of the post owner will be kept constant as Sam, a common gender-neutral name in the U.S.

    Then, participants will be directed to a virtual chatting room where they will wait for Sam for 15 seconds. Once they see Sam enter the chatting room, they will chat with Sam for 30 seconds. In fact, a chatbot will display pre-designated generic messages to the participants (e.g., ‘Hello, nice to meet you’). This procedure is to make participants believe the existence of their ostensible partner.

    Specifically, participants will talk about what they did during Spring break. Once participants submit their responses to the chatting room, they will receive the pre-designed message saying "I went to Cancun because my parents bought me an airplane ticket and all-exclusive hotel fee.", which is an envy manipulation method.

    Could you give me more advice regarding how I can embed the fake chatting room in Qualtrics?

    Best,
    Ashley

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