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Scoring Overview Table (360)

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About the Scoring Overview Table

The Scoring Overview table displays a comparison of scores between rater groups and helps the subject identify strengths and weakness amongst those scores. The table can either display the range of scores for each item in a scoring category, or each scoring category overall.

Data Source

You must set up scoring categories before you use a scoring overview table in your report. The scoring overview table can show data in two different ways:

  1. See an overview of specific questions (“items”) in one scoring category.
  2. See an overview of all scoring categories.
Qtip: Scoring overview tables only show data from one 360 project at a time. If you want to compare scores or items across different surveys, you should add a separate scoring overview table for each survey you want to compare.

Overview of Questions in a Scoring Category

Scoring overviews broken out by average score for each rater group for each item in a scoring category

Example: “Actively listens to others” and “Communicates clearly and concisely” are items in the Communication scoring category.
  1. Under Data Source, choose the project you want to pull data from. By default, this will be the 360 project you created the report in.
    Click on a visualization to open the editing pane. First three dropdown fields regarding data sources are highlighted here
  2. Change your Data Source Type to Questions.
  3. Under Scoring Category, choose the scoring category you want to display items from. You can only pick one.
  4. Under Questions, select the items you want to display. Deselect items in this dropdown to hide items you don’t want to include in the chart.
Qtip: If your x-axis values look larger than you’d expect an average score to be, check your survey questions’ recode values. These are safe to edit any time during, before, or after data collection.

Overview of Scoring Categories

Scoring overviews broken out by average score for each rater group for scoring category

Example: Communication and Drive for Results are two different scoring categories in a 360 evaluation. Here, we’re showing the average score each rater group gave this subject on these two categories.
  1. Choose the project you want to pull data from. By default, this will be the 360 project you created the report in.
    Click on a visualization to open the editing pane. First three dropdown fields regarding data sources are highlighted here
  2. Change your Data Source Type to Questions.
  3. Choose the scoring categories you want to display. You can pick as few or as many as you want.

Display Logic

Display logic is a means of hiding a chart or table if not enough responses have been collected yet. It works the same way in this visualization as it does in all other 360 visualizations. See the linked page for more details.

Filters

Showing how the selected filters in the editing pane correspond to what's displayed in the chart itself

Filters are important in 360 for deciding what relationships you want to use to break out data in charts and tables. By default, we include filters for Self (the subject’s self-assessment), Others (all other evaluations of the subject, excluding the self-assessment), and All (all evaluations of the subject).

If you want to filter by another relationship (e.g., Managers, Peer, Colleagues, custom relationship), you will need to create a new rater group.

Filter Names

Once you’ve selected your filters, you can adjust how they’re named on the visualization.

Showing where header settings correspond to the graph

Visualization Type

The scoring overview table comes with two different visualizations: table or chart.

Table

Each row of the table is a scoring category or item, and each column will show the average score for each rater group selected.

Table as described

Chart

Each bar represents an average. The x-axis of your chart is average score.

Chart as described

Decimal Places

Decimal places dropdown

Adjust the number of decimal places displayed in numbers on the table. Pick from 0 to 5.

Range

Range with min and max in the chart editor pane

The range will adjust the x-axis of the chart. You can erase the value you’ve entered to allow the chart to automatically set a minimum and maximum value.

Qtip: Remember that your edits are applicable to all subjects’ reports – if you make your range too narrow, the chart may look good to some subjects and not others.

Strength and Weakness Thresholds

If you’ve selected the chart visualization, you can decide if you’d like to identify the gaps between how two filter groups rated the subject. By default, this is a means of comparing how the subject evaluated themselves. This comparison allows you to identify different kinds of strengths and weakness by seeing where those evaluations are in agreement, and where those evaluations diverged.

To use this feature:

  1. Set Enable threshold texts to Yes. To disable this feature, switch it to No.
    Steps numbered in the editing pane
  2. Select the two groups you want to compare evaluations between. Usually, this is Self and Others, but you can choose any two rater groups.
  3. Identify the threshold for “strong” scores.
    Qtip: Think about your scoring categories. How many points are on the scales? (E.g., 1 – 7 options, or 1- 5?) What’s the maximum value? What’s a realistic indication of strength? Are there industry standards for the measure you’re using? For example, maybe it’s rare to get an average rating of 5 / 5, so strengths are anything above 4.
  4. Identify the threshold for “weak” scores.
  5. Identify the minimum gap that should be identified. This means that when comparing the ratings your rater groups (e.g., self vs. others) gave on the same items, what’s the lowest difference between average ratings that should be acknowledged.
    Qtip: Think about your scale’s range again. If a subject says they score 5 / 5 on Communication and other evaluators say they score an average of 4.9 / 5, would you want this difference to be highlighted as an unrecognized weakness? Or is the difference between these ratings negligible?
  6. If you want to modify the messages that appear as filter groups are compared, click Edit threshold text.
  7. Modify the text as needed. Here is how the text displays by default:
    Threshold text window opens with fields for each of the listed criteria

    • Clear weakness: A recognized weakness means self-rating and ratings from others are both below the average for this competency.
    • Unrecognized weakness: Unrecognized weakness comes from discrepancy between the self-rating and the ratings from others.
    • Unrecognized strength: Unrecognized strength comes from discrepancy between the self-rating and the ratings from others.
    • Clear strength: You and other evaluators think this area is a top strength.
  8. After you’ve modified the text, click Save and apply.
Qtip: Use the Reset button to reset to the default text.

The footer contains the following text, which explains how the agreement chart works so subjects can better understand their reports. Select or deselect the Footer checkbox to either hide or display this footer.

Displayed is the range of scores for each competency/behavior. The bar represents the numerical average.

 

Qtip: You can add your own custom text using a text area.

Styles

Styles tab of a chart has a margin dropdown

Switch to the Styles tab to adjust the margins around the edge of your chart. Switch to Advanced to adjust margins on each side independently of each other.