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Key Drivers Widget (CX)

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About Key Drivers Widgets

The key drivers widget allows you to see the correlation between one outcome metric and one or more potential drivers.

Key Drivers Widget

Field Type Compatibility

Only Number Sets, Numeric Values, and individual items from field groups are compatible with the key drivers widget. For more information on field types and widget compatibility, check out our Field Type & Widget Compatibility Table.

Widget Customization

Outcome Metric

The outcome metric is a measure of progress that is influenced by key drivers. For example, a company might be concerned about their clients’ overall satisfaction with a particular product or service. The outcome metric in this case would be an overall satisfaction score.

Outcome Metric option in righthand editing pane

Potential Drivers

Potential drivers are performance-based metrics that influence the outcome metric. For example, if a company’s outcome metric is overall satisfaction for a product or service, potential drivers might include quality, value, or usefulness.

Potential Drivers section in righthand editing pane

Specifying Field Bounds

You can specify field bounds when your metric is set to either average or top / bottom box. Depending on the selected metric, the setup is different.

If you would like to specify the upper and lower absolute limits of a field value (so the widget knows how to make its calculations), you can specify the field bounds for any potential driver that you add to your widget if the metric is average. You will click on the name of the potential driver, check the box for Specify Field Bounds, and then set your field minimum and field maximum for the selected driver. The purpose is to allow the bounds to be greater in both directions than what is observed in your response data.

Example: For example, you may have a multiple choice question where respondents can select choices 1-10, but only choices 2-7 have been selected thus far. If you’d still like to make your calculation based on the highest possible choice, you can do so by specifying your minimum and maximum field bounds as 0 and 10, respectively.

Specify Field Bounds within Potential Driver menu

If you would like to specify the upper and lower absolute limits of a field value and the metric is top / bottom box, you can do so by specifying the box range. You will click on the name of the potential driver and then move the sliders for the Box Range to set your field minimum and field maximum for the selected driver.For Top Box Bottom Box, adjust the sliders

Qtip: The values come from your selected field’s recode values.

Performance Axis

The performance axis refers to the x-axis of the key drivers widget. This axis can be renamed by typing your desired name in the Label text box.

The Metric determines how the key drivers are calculated. See the Interpretation section for more.

Lastly, you can determine the Threshold Type, which will adjust the vertical line along the x-axis:

  • Static: Determine where the vertical threshold line will lie on the x-axis. Moving the Threshold Marker allows you to decide the point at which a score changes from performing well to performing poorly.
  • Dynamic: The threshold line will automatically be set to the median values of the drivers being pulled into the widget.
    Qtip: Customer satisfaction data is often driven by the data collected, not hardcoded standards. In cases where there are no industry standards, this option can be favorable.

Label and Threshold Marker in Performance Axis options

Importance Axis

The importance axis refers to the y-axis of the key drivers widget. This axis can be renamed by typing your desired name in the Label text box.

Here, you can determine the Threshold Type, which will adjust the horizontal line along the y-axis:

  • Static: Determine where the vertical threshold line will lie on the y-axis. Moving the Threshold Marker (not pictured) allows you to decide the point at which a score changes from performing well to performing poorly.
  • Dynamic: The threshold line will automatically be set to the median values of the drivers being pulled into the widget.
    Qtip: Customer satisfaction data is often driven by the data collected, not hardcoded standards. In cases where there are no industry standards, this option can be favorable.

Label and threshold itself in Importance Axis

Legend Values

Click on the color swatch to change the color of the driver circles for each quadrant. You can also select the default text and type in your own legend values.

Legend Values section in righthand editing pane

If you don’t want to display the legend in the widget, you can deselect Show Legend.

Display options

Select from the different Display Options to further customize the widget.

Select Show X Axis to display the Performance percentages along the bottom of the widget.

Show X Axis checkbox in Display Options section

Select Show Y Axis to display the importance values along the left side of the widget.

Show Y Axis checkbox in Display Options section

Select Show Labels to show the labels next to the drivers within the widget.

Show Labels checkbox in Display Options section

Select Scale Range Automatically to adjust minimum and maximum axis values automatically. This does not adjust your threshold markers. Rather, it serves to “zoom in” or “zoom out” to give you the best possible view of your key drivers.
Scale Range Automatically checkbox within Display Options section

Select Scale Data Points by Sample Size to adjust the size of each driver circle relative to the other driver circles’ sample sizes. The larger the circle, the larger the sample size.

Scale Data Points by Sample Size checked in the Display Options

Show number of responses for each data value in tooltip ensures that when someone hovers over a data point, a tooltip will show them the performance, importance, and sample size for that data point.

Hovering over CES dot on the key drivers widget, tooltip shows the numbers mentioned

Interpretation

The Y-axis, also called the importance axis, is a value between 0 and 1 that represents how strongly a given driver is correlated with the outcome metric. It is calculated by taking the absolute value of Pearson’s r, such that:

Importance = | r |

As the importance value gets closer to 1, the relationship between the driver and outcome is understood to be stronger.

The X-axis, also called the performance axis, is a normalized scale. This means the value ranges from 0% to 100%. This axis is normalized, and depending on whether you selected average or top / bottom box for your metric, is either dependent on the average score or the top / bottom boxes of scores. Normalizing makes it possible to compare potential drivers with different scales. The percentage for average is calculated by taking the value for the outcome metric’s potential driver and dividing it by the maximum possible value of the potential driver.

Example: Let’s say you ask respondents to answer a question on a scale from one to five. If the highest score a participant gives for this question is a four, then four will be used as the denominator when calculating the percentage on the performance axis.

The percentage for top / bottom box is calculated by taking the value for the outcome metric’s potential driver and dividing it by 100.

The key drivers widget is divided into four quadrants:

  • Important and highly rated: These values fall in the top right quadrant and indicate drivers that play a large role in determining the outcome measure.  These drivers also have higher scores. For example, “Service Satisfaction” drives overall satisfaction in such a way that higher perceived safety is related to higher overall satisfaction scores.  In this case, respondents have also indicated that this company is performing well with regards to “Service Satisfaction.”
    Important but Highly rated in top-right quadrant of graph
  • Important but poorly rated: These values fall in the top left quadrant and indicate drivers that play a large role in determining the outcome measure. However, these drivers have lower scores. For example, “Product Satisfaction” plays a big role in determining overall satisfaction in such a way that poor products are related to lower overall satisfaction scores. In this case, respondents indicated that this company is not doing well in regards to controlling “Product Satisfaction.” This is an area of improvement for this company.
    Important but Poorly Rated in top-left quadrant of graph
  • Not important and poorly rated: These values fall in the bottom left quadrant and indicate drivers that are not important in determining the outcome measure. These drivers also have low scores. For example, “Frequency of Contacting Support” doesn’t drive overall satisfaction scores and respondents also indicated this company was not having to contact support often. However, this company might not need to improve on this driver because it isn’t affecting their overall satisfaction.
    Not Important and Poorly Rated in bottom-left quadrant of graph
  • Not important but highly rated: These values fall in the bottom right quadrant and indicate drivers that are not important in determining the outcome measure. These drivers also have a high score. For example, “Resolution Time” does not drive satisfaction, but it was given high scores by respondents. While one might argue that having a good resolution time for escalated issues is always a good thing, it does not influence this company’s overall customer satisfaction.Not Important but Highly Rated in bottom-right quadrant of graph

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